Mon. Dec 9th, 2019

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Seven Wonders of Chile

5 min read
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  1. Easter island

Easter Island (Rapa NuiRapa NuiSpanishIsla de Pascua) is a Chilean island in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle in Oceania. Easter Island is most famous for its nearly 1,000 extant monumental statues, called moai, created by the early Rapa Nui people. In 1995, UNESCO named Easter Island a World Heritage Site, with much of the island protected within Rapa Nui National Park.

It is believed that Easter Island’s Polynesian inhabitants arrived on Easter Island sometime near 1200 AD.[3] They created a thriving and industrious culture, as evidenced by the island’s numerous enormous stone moai and other artifacts. However, land clearing for cultivation and the introduction of the Polynesian rat led to gradual deforestation.[3]By the time of European arrival in 1722, the island’s population was estimated to be 2,000–3,000. European diseases, Peruvian slave raiding expeditions in the 1860s, and emigration to other islands, e.g. Tahiti, further depleted the population, reducing it to a low of 111 native inhabitants in 1877.[4]

Chile annexed Easter Island in 1888. In 1966, the Rapa Nui were granted Chilean citizenship. In 2007 the island gained the constitutional status of “special territory.” Administratively, it belongs to the Valparaíso Region, comprising a single commune of the Province Isla de Pascua.[5] The 2017 Chilean census registered 7,750 people on the island, of whom 3,512 (45%) considered themselves Rapa Nui.[6]

Easter Island is one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world.[ The nearest inhabited land (around 50 residents in 2013) is Pitcairn Island, 2,075 kilometres (1,289 mi) away;the nearest town with a population over 500 is Rikitea, on the island of Mangareva, 2,606 km (1,619 mi) away; the nearest continental point lies in central Chile, 3,512 kilometres (2,182 mi) away.

2.Palacio de la Moneda

Palacio de La Moneda (Spanish: [paˈlasjo ðe la moˈneða]Palace of the Mint), or simply La Moneda, is the seat of the President of the Republic of Chile. It also houses the offices of three cabinet ministers: Interior, General Secretariat of the Presidency and General Secretariat of the Government. It occupies an entire block in downtown Santiago, in the area known as Civic District between Moneda (North Side), Morandé (East), Alameda del Libertador Bernardo O’Higgins (South) and Teatinos street (West).[2]

3.Pukara de Quitor

Pukará de Quitor (also spelled Pucará de Quitor) (Quechuapukara fortress)[1] is a pre-Columbianarchaeological site in northern Chile. This stone fortress is located 3 km northwest of the town of San Pedro de Atacama, overlooking the valley of the river San Pedro. It was designated a national monument in 1982.

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4.The Clock Tower of Iquique

The Clock Tower is a National Historic Landmark located in Plaza Arturo Prat in Iquique, Chile. It was built in 1878 (when Iquique was in Peruvian territory), with the mechanism imported from England.

According to Patricio Advis, the Clock Tower, together with the buildings surrounding it in the plaza (the Municipal Theater of Iquique, the building of the Workers Welfare Society of Tarapacá, the Casino Español and the Club Croata) is one of the most representative urban expressions of the “Saltpeter Period”, a time which saw much foreign investment.

5. Tulor

Tulor is an archaeological site located in the Norte Grande natural region of the Antofagasta Region, Chile near San Pedro de Atacama. The site is a former village complex with an area of 5,200 m2 (55,972 sq ft) and 22 outlying edifices. The settlement’s remains are distributed in an east-west fashion along 2 km (1 mi). Radiocarbonand thermoluminescence dating date the origin of the settlement sometime between 380 BCE and 200 CE, but most structures are from the period 800 CE – 1200 CE. Architectural characteristics of Tulor are circular walls are made of mud and vaults.[1] In 1998, the World Monuments Fund, an international non-profit organization, listed Tulor in the 1998 World Monuments Watch List of 100 Most Endangered Sites. After little was done to protect it, the site was re-listed in 2006.

Tulor discoveries consist of many items from boreholes to human remains. Boreholes are the circular walls made out of clay, dug into the earth to find water. In June 1974 archaeologists put the boreholes in order of stratigraphyso they can find out more about how the population disappeared that was once there. The stratigraphy helped in finding out why the population disappeared, which was not due by climatic changes but to an increase in drought. On site they found lithic, human bones, animal bones, ceramic, carbon, and seashells buried in the ground. All these artifacts are considered to be from the mesolithic era.

6. Santa Lucia Hill



Santa Lucía Hill (Spanish: Cerro Santa Lucía) is a small hill in the centre of Santiago, Chile. It is situated between Alameda del Libertador Bernardo O’Higgins in the south, Santa Lucía Street in the west and Victoria Subercaseaux on the east. An adjacent metro station is named after it. The hill has an altitude of 629 m and a height of 69 m over the surrounding area. The hill is the remnant of a volcano 15 million years old.[

The hill comprises a 65,300 square metre park[ adorned with ornate facades, stairways and fountains. At the highest point there is a viewpoint popular with tourists visiting the city.

7.Atacama Desert

The Atacama Desert (Spanish: Desierto de Atacama) is a desert plateau in South America covering a 1000-km (600-mi) strip of land on the Pacific coast, west of the Andes mountains. The Atacama desert is one of the driest places in the world (the driest being the McMurdo Dry Valleys[1][2][3][4]) , as well as the only true desert to receive less precipitation than the polar deserts. According to estimates, the Atacama Desert occupies 105,000 km2(41,000 sq mi),[ or 128,000 km2 (49,000 sq mi) if the barren lower slopes of the Andes are included. Most of the desert is composed of stony terrain, salt lakes (salares), sand, and felsic lava that flows towards the Andes.

The desert owes its extreme aridity to a constant temperature inversion due to the cool north-flowing Humboldt ocean current, and to the presence of the strong Pacific anticyclone.[ The most arid region of the Atacama desert is situated between two mountain chains (the Andes and the Chilean Coast Range) of sufficient height to prevent moisture advection from either the Pacific or the Atlantic Oceans, a two-sided rain shadow.

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